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The Museum Of Contemporary Art (MOCA) reopened in June, and is offering visitors the eccentric, saturated, textured creations that art enthusiasts have been craving.

While some may be mask fatigued, adhering to guidelines currently in place at MOCA allows all guests to safely visit well appreciated art exhibits.

Among these exhibits is Carlos Cruz-Diez’s “Cromosaturacion”.

Photo by Michael Sandoval/MUSE TV

MOCA is also currently displaying a piece done by the legendary Yoko Ono. The piece features a bronze hammer and rusted looking nails in a canvas that some may mistake as steel. 

Photo by Michael Sandoval/MUSE TV

“Our House” is among MOCA’s larger exhibits, the largest piece in the collection being Rodney McMillian’s “White House II”. The piece consists of hand-stitched vinyl, representing materials that are mass produced in the U.S.

MOCA
Photo by Michael Sandoval/MUSE TV

Sculptures on display include Liz Larner’s You might have to live like a refuge.

Photo by Michael Sandoval/MUSE TV

The MOCA has shown its dedication to representing the lives of people of color, one example of this being Chris Ofili’s “Afro Muses: Harlem 4”.

MOCA
Photo by Michael Sandoval/MUSE TV

With the world beginning to reach normalcy, MOCA offers the opportunity to add color back into life.

Adriana Lopez

Adriana Lopez graduated from Riverside Community College where she earned her associate degree in journalism. She is now attending California State University Fullerton, where she has continued her journalism studies to obtain a bachelor's degree. Her primary interests in journalism consists of writing about the entertainment industry and interviewing community leaders. When she isn't working or doing school work she is listening to new music releases, watching anime, or trying out new sushi restaurants.